Tuesday, August 18, 2015

From Gown to Day Dress


I love a great collar!


So as soon as I saw Butterick 6022 I knew I had to make my own version.


And when I saw this cotton batiste I knew what my next Britex guest blogger project would be!


The fabric is quite sheer, so I underlined it with a cotton voile.


This seems to be the summer of the dart.  I keep choosing patterns that require a whole lot of them!


The neckline was stabilized with rayon seam binding.


And, of course, I bound the raw edges of the fabric with more seam binding.


The skirt did drop a bit along the bias which I was not expecting from such a lightweight and stable cotton.


Marking a hem has got to be one of my least favorite parts of the sewing process.  I think I need one of those vintage contraptions that sits on the floor and sprays chalk at an even level directly on the fabric.  Do they still make those?


My reward for sitting on the floor with a ruler and pincushion was getting to hand sew the hem (I know, I'm weird)!


And as a final touch, I added lingerie guards to the neckline.  Those tiny little snaps got away from me a few times, but I eventually managed to wrangle them into place!


[The fabric for this dress was received in exchange for my contributions as a Britex Guest Blogger.]


20 comments:

  1. That dress is like a dream! :-) I have a vintage Swedish pattern with almost exactly the same gown, only there's no train, and no CB slit in the collar - they probably plagiarized an American pattern. Thanks for opening my eyes - I never realized what a different dress it would be in cotton with a shorter hem, and now I want to sew one for myself!

    BTW, it's called skirt marker, they're still made, and they're really great! I made a Hollyburn skirt recently, and with my combination of hips and fabric choice I needed to take 1 to 2" off the front and back to get the sides level. Easy as pie thanks to the skirt marker.

    My skirt marker is a vintage Prym, probably 1960s (the box says "mini, midi, maxi - marks hems up to 90 cm (35.5") off the floor"!). It has a weighted, but rather flat, base which is nice and stable. Dritz has a three-legged one, which looks like a potential tripping hazard when you're rotating to mark the hem all way around.

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    1. Now I definitely want one! And I am sure the vintage ones are sturdier than anything made in the last twenty years or so. I will have to keep my eyes open!

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  2. I aspire to your level of sewing!

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  3. Fun fabric; splotchy dots!

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  4. Love this dress and the fabric! Well done as always.

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  5. I've seen them in the notions aisle of any Jo-Ann Fabrics, they're towards the bottom with the other larger/bulkier items.

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    1. Thanks for the info - I will definitely keep my eyes open next time I am at JoAnns. So glad to hear they are still manufactured!

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  6. Gorgeous! Which color number of Gutterman thread is that? Is your waist-stay ribbon two and a half inches wide?

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    1. The waist stay is 1" wide, and I will have to check on the thread color . . .

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  7. This is really beautiful - the color of the fabric is just luscious! I would love to find one of those hem-marking contraptions - I remember my mom using one and thinking it was so clever.

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  8. Very nice work, there is something about hand stitching that can relaxing

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  9. Oh so lovely! I have always thought it would be fun to make a day dress from a gown pattern - and you showed me how! It's still floaty; maybe you can get an invite to the Queen's garden tea party!

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  10. Beautiful! The pattern illustration looks very much like my, er, my much older sister's bridesmaids dresses. I love it as a casual dress.

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    1. It absolutely looks like a bridesmaid dress, and that poly satin that they used adds a 1980s vibe I wanted to avoid!

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  11. I love, love this dress and can't wait to see it on (please!).the fabric is gorgeous just my kind of fabric. The shape and colour beautiful, as is the insides.

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  12. Yes, they do still make skirt markers! Mine is a 30 year old Prym puff marker, I don't know any better way to get an even hem. Your dress is beautiful!

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  13. Looks like there is a 'hack' comment under your lovely dress discussion!

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  14. When I mark a skirt hem, I pick up my dress form and put it on my cutting table so I can sit on a stool. Much easier on the back!

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  15. Wawak totally has skirt markers! Although this type uses pins. I had one that blasted chalk but it was super messy and useless.
    http://www.wawak.com/Skirt-Marker

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