Wednesday, April 4, 2018

Playing with Plaid


This is my Christmas skirt.  I finally found a use for this heavy duty wool coating that has been taking up a ton of space in my fabric bureau, and I figured that the red and green color combo was suitably festive.


Once I knew that I wanted to make a circle skirt, I pulled out Vogue 2902.  I know it seems silly, but having a pattern to work off of is so much easier for me than taking measurements and trying to figure out if I have enough fabric.  The dress pattern uses a circle skirt, so I just borrow that pattern piece.


After figuring out the best way to deal with the very large pattern repeat (I didn't have quite enough to match side seams), I cut out a shaped waistband.


I added pieces of boning to the waistband lining to keep the wide waistband from collapsing during wear.


After the plaid matching attempt, the waistband was probably the most time consuming part of the project.


Once that was complete, I inserted a zipper by hand at the center back.


And I absolutely bound those raw edges with rayon seam binding!


Before hand stitching the waistband lining in place, I added ribbon hangers to each side of the skirt.  I do this for most of my skirts, but I knew this would be absolutely necessary with this heavy fabric - there is no way one of those flimsy clip skirt hangers could handle this baby!


I often forget to add the ribbons until I am halfway through my hand stitching, but this time I managed to pull out my box of satin ribbon before pinning the waistband into place!


And then on to hemming . . .  The hem dropped significantly along the bias, and I am really surprised at how much it did.  I anticipated that the weight of the fabric would make it stable.  It does drape nicely, however, which I suspect is why it was necessary to even things out.


And then there was a bit more hand sewing.


I just love a good catch-stitch!  And the hem means this lady is finished!




9 comments:

  1. Beautiful skirt! I love all your finishing touches and care in these details. I also love a good catch stitch and use it on almost all my hems. Karen

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  2. Beautiful skirt! Ever used the catch stitch on hems I will have to try it the next time I hem a skirt.

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  3. Hi LauraMae: Oh, I love your skirt! Thank you so very much for sharing your tips ... from Lynda in Toronto (ps - I enjoy seeing everything you post; Your style and skills are extraordinary!!)

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  4. Omgoodness! Another beautiful creation using fabric art! You are a phenomenal seamstress. Thanks so much for always sharing the details of your creations.

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  5. Another TKO in your wardrobe. Awaiting your turn at modeling this one.

    The boning is what sets your efforts apart - so structural, yet completely invisible, all adding up to a totally put-together you.

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  6. What a brilliant idea to use the skirt portion of that pattern to make a skirt and then to add boning to the waistband for more support. I have that pattern so if i want to make a circle skirt i will copy your idea. I wonder if a cotton gingham would make a nice summer skirt. Would you line ior interface it and put horsehair braid in the hem? And pair it with a white cotton shirt and some kind of belt or sash.

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    1. I have wanted a gingham circle skirt for a long time - just never came across the right fabric. I probably would not add horsehair to the hem, and if the fabric is not too sheer, I would probably not line it, either. With a really large gingham, I might, since those white squares would probably been a bit sheer!

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  7. Beautiful! Can't wait to see it worn!

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  8. I made a similar skirt for the holidays too and love it and get compliments all the time! Yours looks so dramatic and gorgeous! Love the details. Considering it's a timeless keepsake type garment, the extra work seems entirely worth it!

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